Saturday, 16 May 2009

On Safari in Cornwall (3)

Lanyon Quoit.
The info for Lanyon Quoit is from
Look Around Cornwall Lanyon Quoit
Lanyon Quoit is probably one of the best-known of Cornwall's ancient monuments, dating from the Neolithic period (3500-2500BC). The huge capstone originally stood atop four upright stone columns, but it crashed to the ground, smashing some of the stone supports during a storm in 1815.
The quoit was subsequently re-erected, at right-angles to its original position, on top of what remained of the uprights. Originally tall enough for a horse and rider to pass beneath, it now stands a little over a metre tall. If you feel at ease beneath several tons of stone you can sit comfortably underneath Lanyon Quoit.
It is believed that Lanyon and other quoits in the area were used as ritual funeral sites. It's possible that bodies were laid on top of the capstone to be eaten by carrion birds. Similar sites show evidence of bones from several individuals, and it's thought that bones were moved to sites such as Lanyon and used in rituals, perhaps involving attempts to communicate with ancestors and the spirit world.
Lanyon Quoit is situated in a field by the side of the Morvah to Madron road. It's easy to miss, there's a layby with space for a couple of cars and a small National Trust sign on the hedge. It's just a few hundred metres south of Men-an-tol, which is also worth a visit .
To visit "Look Around Cornwall click HERE
To be continued.

14 comments:

Kitty said...

Misty and tourist-free = wonderful shot!

Cezar and Léia said...

This post is very informative!Wonderful place and picture!
Kind regards
Léia

Gattina said...

How interesting, also you post below ! I have absolutely to visit this area one day. The friends where I am staying each year and who live in Eastbourne, the husband is from Cornwall he even went to school with John Nettles, Mr. Barnaby !

yesbuts said...

If that's the table, where are the four matching chairs? :(

Abe Lincoln said...

Very interesting post. I am always in awe of hoe they moved these giant stones in those days. The only thing I can think of is they knew more about gravity than we did. And so did the Egyptians. Or, maybe the Aliens helped.

Gail's Man said...

Like your new home. Fully air conditioned and no need to employ a window cleaner!

Great shot, very atmospheric.

Shammickite said...

Great pictures and information. I'm from Deveon, not too far from Cornwall.

Denise said...

This is a wonderful place. I had never heard of it before. Beautiful Cornish countryside on the 360 degrees virtual photograph on the link. Spectacular and I loved your photo of Lanyon Quoit. Very informative post.

George said...

What an interesting post. It's amazing that the quoit was re-erected after the storm. All too often ancient artifacts are left to crumble and disappear. I look forward to our next stop.

Laura ~Peach~ said...

awesome stuff, makes the imagination wander!

lynnwiles said...

I like the mist and the b&w, it adds a lot and makes it art instead of a tourist photo. Good job, Mac.

Michele said...

What a neat monument but weird if they actually did put the dead bodies on top and had the Carrion eat them... ewwww....

fishing guy said...

Mac: WOW, That is a tribut to you English to let it stand all these years.

RuneE said...

That kind of places is like a magnet to me - I'm glad that you can be my stand-in!

PS Thank you for the comments - the fog is slowly lifting...